One thing that we know from working with the highest level athletes is that they value and actively exploit recovery in order to perform better. This contrasts with the views that we hear in the corporate world, where is appears there is a perception sometimes that sleep and downtime are an inconvenience to getting a job done, rather than an essential influence on a person’s ability to sustain excellence and constantly improve.

So, given we’re in challenging times, it’s worth thinking about how effectively you’re utilising rest and recovery to deal with what is essentially a more draining and energy sapping time. Ask yourself whether you’re managing to feel refreshed as a result of your sleep. Check whether you’re getting any opportunities within the course of a challenging day to get a worthwhile time-out so that you can have a mini re-charge, so you can give a concerted effort again. Check whether you’re assuming that you can keep giving your optimum performance without paying attention to the need to rest your brain and body. Are you using rest, recovery and time-out for a competitive advantage? If you work out the ideal recovery strategy for you and put that alongside the optimal performance delivery strategy, then you’re going to be winning more consistently.

Don’t let the situation you’re in control you to make poor performance choices. You control the situation – the situation does not control you.