Something we work on a lot in the world of high performance sport revolves around the concept of “competitive learning”. If we can learn quicker, more effectively and produce performance refinements quicker than the opposition (between races or matches, or within a tournament), then we know we’re gaining a competitive advantage when we’re not head to head.

Imagine how much speed of learning and reaction to learning is critical in the current climate. Agility is often talked about with the corporate world (are you agile or fragile?, etc). However, agility has to be the result of great learning through superb knowledge of your own performance and extreme confidence to be able to make the right decisions about how to alter your focus or intent.

Individual or collective learning is a skill, so you have to practise it to get better at it. Just hoping you’ll get better at learning quickly in these highly pressured times simply doesn’t cut it. Maybe by working out how learning can be competitively advantageous for you, you’ll be able to decide how you might invest more effectively in this critical element of performance.

If you can get access to this Harvard Business Review article, it’s well worth a read to help clarify one particular way in which learning might work for you. (Learning in the thick of it).

Come and pick our brains about how competitive learning works – can you afford not to right now, when every experience is precious and every performance moment counts?